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* Campus Internet outage planned for morning of April 6

The Shoreline Community College website and all other Internet connectivity will be down from 9-11 a.m., Saturday, April 6.

 

The outage is required while work is done to reroute some fiber optic cable on campus. The work will strengthen the campus technology infrastructure. While the outage is scheduled to start at 9 a.m. and end no later than 11 a.m., service may be restored sooner.

 

During the outage, anything that relies on an Internet connection from the campus will be unavailable, including college e-mail. Both go.shoreline.edu and shoreline.edu e-mail addresses will be affected.

 

Shoreline uses a number of services that are hosted off-campus such as the Canvas and Blackboard learning management systems and various blogs. Those off-campus hosted services will be available, although they will not be accessible through the college website durng the outage. 

 

 

SCC/Jim Hills

* Shoreline gets $350,000 energy efficiency grant

Shoreline Community College is getting some significant help from the state and Seattle City Light to be more energy efficient.

oldlightpolejpg.jpgThe state Department of Commerce has awarded the college a $349,643 grant to improve campus lighting, conserve water and upgrade the computer server room. Another $65,821 will come as a utility incentive from Seattle City Light.

“Shoreline is committed to sustainability and energy efficiency,” President Lee Lambert said. “I want to thank all who were involved in helping us secure this grant, including our grant writer, Brandon Rogers, Vice President for Administrative Services Daryl Campbell and Budget Director Holly Woodmansee.”

The total cost of the improvements is more than the grant and incentive, so Shoreline will use a Certificate of Participation (COP) loan from the state to finance the project. The college will repay the COP with some of the money saved by the energy and water efficiency improvements.

To meet the eligibility requirements for the grant and make sure the savings would at least equal the expenditures, Shoreline commissioned an investment grade audit. For the audit, Shoreline partnered with Trane, who provided a list of recommendations as well as secured the utility incentives. If for some reason the efficiency savings fall short of the COP repayment, Trane would be obligated to make up the difference.

Shoreline was also required to provide evidence of an institutional commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Shoreline was able to provide five examples of this commitment:

  •  Shoreline Community College Climate Action Plan
  •  Shoreline Community College Recycling Plan
  • Shoreline Community College’s Commute Trip Reduction Survey
  • Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) Framework, Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE)
  • American College and University President's Climate Commitment

The details of implementing the project are still being worked out, Facilities and Capital Projects Director Bob Roehl said. However, throughout the life project, the state Department of Enterprise Services will provide consulting services and verify that energy savings are on track.

Shoreline is one of 12 higher education institutions to receive such grants. The other schools are: Big Bend Community College, Community Colleges of Spokane, Green River Community College, Highline Community College, Olympic College, Pierce College, UW Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington (Seattle), UW Medical Center, Washington State University, Yakima Valley Community College. Another 37 local government agencies received grants. The entire program totaled $18 million in awards.

SCC/Jim Hills

* Shoreline gets $350,000 energy efficiency grant

Shoreline Community College is getting some significant help from the state and Seattle City Light to be more energy efficient.

The state Department of Commerce has awarded the college a $349,643 grant to improve campus lighting, conserve water and upgrade the computer server room. Another $65,821 will come as a utility incentive from Seattle City Light.

“Shoreline is committed to sustainability and energy efficiency,” President Lee Lambert said. “I want to thank all who were involved in helping us secure this grant, including our grant writer, Brandon Rogers, Vice President for Administrative Services Daryl Campbell and Budget Director Holly Woodmansee.”

The total cost of the improvements is more than the grant and incentive, so Shoreline will use a Certificate of Participation (COP) loan from the state to finance the project. The college will repay the COP with some of the money saved by the energy and water efficiency improvements.

To meet the eligibility requirements for the grant and make sure the savings would at least equal the expenditures, Shoreline commissioned an investment grade audit. For the audit, Shoreline partnered with Trane, who provided a list of recommendations as well as secured the utility incentives. If for some reason the efficiency savings fall short of the COP repayment, Trane would be obligated to make up the difference.

Shoreline was also required to provide evidence of an institutional commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Shoreline was able to provide five examples of this commitment:

  •  Shoreline Community College Climate Action Plan
  •  Shoreline Community College Recycling Plan
  • Shoreline Community College’s Commute Trip Reduction Survey
  • Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) Framework, Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE)
  • American College and University President's Climate Commitment

The details of implementing the project are still being worked out, Facilities and Capital Projects Director Bob Roehl said. However, throughout the life project, the state Department of Enterprise Services will provide consulting services and verify that energy savings are on track.

Shoreline is one of 12 higher education institutions to receive such grants. The other schools are: Big Bend Community College, Community Colleges of Spokane, Green River Community College, Highline Community College, Olympic College, Pierce College, UW Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington (Seattle), UW Medical Center, Washington State University, Yakima Valley Community College. Another 37 local government agencies received grants. The entire program totaled $18 million in awards.

SCC/Jim Hills

* First Science Fair finds the right formula
GuyHamiltonScienceFair.jpg
Guy Hamilton, Director of the Biotechology Program at Shoreline Community College, shows a young attendee how use a pipette at the first Shoreline Science Fair, March 23, 2013, hosted at the college. More photos

The first Shoreline Science Fair was a big hit with participants and organizers.

The March 23, 2013, fair was hosted at Shoreline Community College and drew 50 entrants from across Shoreline and Lake Forest Park. The independent fair is the brainchild of Shoreline resident Ray Koelling. The fair was open to anyone generally in grades 4-12 from any school.

While the fair drew students from Shoreline-area schools, it was not sponsored by the district. Koelling and co-organizer Keith Officer also put together a science career fair that ran concurrently with the judged competition for the students.

Officer said he felt the event was very successful and is looking forward to doing it again next year.

The event has a web site at www.shorelinesciencefair.org and Officer said official results would likely be posted there.

SCC/Jim Hills   
* Notices go out on master plan and housing

The next step along the path to a Master Development Plan that now includes student housing at Shoreline Community hits the mail today, March 22, 2012.

“As required by the City of Shoreline, we are sending notices of two public meetings that will be hosted here on campus,” said Daryl Campbell, Vice President for Administrative Services at the college. “We’re excited to show the community what we’ve got in mind and to get feedback to see how it might be even better.”

Link

The city requires meeting notices be mailed to all residences within 500 feet of the college, but Campbell said the college is trying to let everyone know about the open meetings. “We want to share with our neighbors and the larger community and hear what everyone has to say,” he said.

The meetings are actually part of the city’s required process for a Master Development Plan. The college did such meetings in December, 2010, but at that time, student housing wasn’t anticipated. Since then, a private investor group came forward and put housing in the mix. Because of the time delay and the added project, city officials asked for new public meetings.

At the April 9 meeting, attendees will get an overview of the city’s planning and review steps, including the Master Development Plan and State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) processes. Officials will describe projects anticipated to be developed in the next 10 years. They will also ask for comments and discuss how feedback will be used to inform decisions.

At the April 23 meeting, officials will review and respond to comments received at the first meeting, then describe the process moving forward in review of the Master Development Plan.

Both meetings will be from 6-8 p.m., in the 9000 Building (PUB), Room 9208. City staff, college officials and college consultant staff will be on hand. The meetings will be recorded.

The student housing project that is now part of the proposed Master Development Plan is proposed to include 400-beds. It would be sited in the general area of the current soccer field at the north end of the campus.

“Student housing is becoming an increasingly important part education delivery for community colleges,” Campbell said. “Shoreline has a number of programs – automotive, machining, nursing, dental hygiene, film, our terrific science offerings and others – that draw students from outside the area. In addition, our international-student numbers are growing. This past fall, we swamped the existing supply of homestay options for international students.”

Campbell said that if approved, the housing project would be first-come, first-served. “This project will be available to help all our students,” he said.

The idea for student housing came in 2011 when local resident David Lee approached the college with an idea for a privately funded and operated project. Shoreline President Lee Lambert met with David Lee and investors in China in September, 2011 to sign a memorandum of understanding that opened the way for further talks. In February, 2012, Campbell updated the college Board of Trustees on the project, and in December, 2012, Lambert signed a more definitive memorandum of agreement with the investors.

On Feb. 13, 2013, officials from the college, the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC), the state Attorney General’s Office and the investors met to discuss details of the proposal. Because the project is proposed on state-owned land, the SBCTC must give approval and the state Attorney General’s Office works out the details of the lease. Both of those items are proceeding.

On Feb. 14, immediate neighbors to the college and other interested parties were mailed a notification as required under Washington’s State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). That notice said the college intends to amend previous planning documents adopted in 2003, 2006 and 2011 to include the proposed housing project. The notice also said that the proposed housing project won’t have significant environmental impacts beyond those already anticipated in previously approved and adopted planning documents.

“These public meetings on our Master Development Plan are the next steps toward a project that we believe will help our students and our community,” Campbell said. 

SCC/Jim Hills

* Online education study, articles spark response

The director of the Virtual College at Shoreline Community College is diving into the conversation around a recent study and news articles regarding online education.

AnnGarnseyHarter1Web.jpg

   Ann Garnsey-Harter

Link

“Recent news articles and editorials on the efficacy of online learning at the college level sparked considerable chatter within the higher education community,” Ann Garnsey-Harter posted in her blog. “Shoreline Community College was no exception to the discussion, but let’s take a deeper look at the numbers.”

Garnsey-Harter says that Shoreline is one of the fastest growing providers of online education within the community and technical college system. “SCC’s online enrollments this academic year have increased by 11-15 percent,” she wrote. The increase, she said, is attributable primarily to the 2010 launch of the “Virtual College,” a strategic initiative that included increasing the number and quality of online course offerings, offering significant faculty training opportunities, adding more robust online student services, and implementing targeted marketing efforts.

Garnsey-Harter takes exception to a recent New York Times editorial that cites a study by Columbia University’s Community College Research Center (CCRC).  The study concludes that typical students have some difficulty adapting to online classes while others adapt poorly.

“The New York Times mixes apples and oranges by referring to numbers for the more recent phenomenon of massively open online courses (MOOCs),” Garnsey-Harter writes. “… MOOCs have very low barriers to entrance and exit.”

On her blog, Garnsey-Harter cites Shoreline statistics for 2008-11 that show, “… Our aggregate pass rates for online and face-to-face students are the same at 70 percent.”

Garnsey-Harter notes that The Seattle Times published an article Sunday, March 17, 2013, about the CCRC study.

“That article outlined the CCRC conclusions from the 2004-09 data, but then also included a chart using only a snapshot of fall 2012 numbers,” she writes. “Fall 2012 is just one data point and there is variability from quarter to quarter and year to year.  We should concern ourselves with trends and working to address the factors that affect those trends.

“I’m not surprised that Shoreline online students are performing well. … Our faculty and staff have worked hard to make the virtual experience for students the same or better than the face-to-face experience.”

Garnsey-Harter says agrees with the CCRC study, The New York Times, and The Seattle Times that there is work to be done: “That’s exactly the direction we’ve been moving at SCC with the Virtual College Initiative.

“And, we need to remember that online learning helps bring education and training to people we could not otherwise serve and it improves their lives.  A variety of approaches can meet the needs of a variety of students.  As a college, Shoreline needs to make sure we keep our eye on meeting those needs.”

SCC/Jim Hills

* State budget inaction won't stop Shoreline

Juliet Lovejoy.jpg

Math faculty member Juliet Lovejoy laughs as she raises her hand to ask another question during the March 15, 2013 all-campus meeting at Shoreline Community College.More photos

When it comes to budgets, Shoreline Community College can’t wait for Olympia.

“We’re going to turn on our budget system and re-engage the whole campus in budget planning,” Daryl Campbell, Vice President for Administrative Services, said at an all-campus meeting on March 15, 2013. Campbell said the campus-wide process would start March 25, long before lawmakers are anticipated to have a state budget and any specific news for Shoreline.

Links

“Because we’ve been prudent, because we’ve sacrificed, we’re in a strong position to deal with whatever they throw at us,” Campbell said, adding that the focus would be on Shoreline’s strengths: Reserves, operating performance and growing non-state-allocated revenue. “We’re going to stop worrying about what they do and focus on what we do.”

For President Lee Lambert, that gives the college a good shot at his top priority: saving jobs

Lambert noted that the economic uncertainties at the federal and state levels – sequestration for the feds and a lack of any substantive news from Olympia – makes iron-clad assurances not possible, but that his hope and intention is to avoid layoffs for the coming year .

“I’m tired of meeting with employees to let them go,” Lambert said. “I’m just so tired of that.”

Lambert said the alternative path is toward revenue for the college that doesn’t come from the Legislature. That path has taken him across the world in support of two strategic initiatives launched two years ago: internationalization and the virtual college.

The success of those initiatives is creating an economic shield for the college and its employees, Lambert said. “Without those two efforts, I’d be up here talking about layoffs,” he said.

During his portion of the meeting, Campbell put some numbers to those successes. Enrollment in online classes through the virtual college is up 15 percent over the past year. Statewide, online enrollments are up only 1 percent, he said.

As for international education, the college has gone from running a deficit on international tuition three years ago to a positive margin of more than $1 million. “And, we expect that to continue to grow,” Campbell said.

Campbell also pointed out that Shoreline is bucking another statewide trend, this one regarding in-state enrollment. As the economy rebounds and various state and federal aid packages are reduced, in-state student numbers are declining across the state system. Shoreline is managing to attract and keep more in-state students that most of the other 34 community and technical colleges, he said.

James Jansen, Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs, gave an update on the ongoing reorganization of his areas. Jansen said he’d met with 11 departments and divisions so far with three more to go. He said he’s hopeful for a final decision later this spring and to begin implementation after July 1.

Jansen acknowledged all the work that has gone into transitioning from Blackboard to Canvas for learning management software. Every class at Shoreline - whether it is taught face-to-face, wholly online or a hybrid – has an online component that allows instructors and students to communicate. Every public college and university in Washington is transitioning to the Canvas system.

Vice President for Human Resources and Legal Affairs Stephen P. Smith spoke about how morale has suffered through the recent years of budget reductions, previous layoffs and other shifts in higher education. “Respect, civility, trust in each other and shared values are keys,” Smith said, adding that he would bring the subject of morale to the College Council meeting scheduled for March 19.

SCC/Jim Hills & Sean Duke


* Shoreline top 6 in U.S. for veterans

Shoreline Community College is one of the top-ranked community colleges in the U.S. when it comes to helping veterans.

Link

“I’m very proud of the work we do in providing a welcoming atmosphere and the services needed to help our military veterans make a successful transition,” said Shoreline President Lee Lambert, who served in the U.S. Army.

In the most recent rankings issued by the Military Times, Shoreline placed sixth among community colleges from across the nation. Shoreline was noted for being at or below the annual tuition assistance cap for military benefits, having relaxed residency rules, accepting ACE credits and having a veterans office.

The veterans office is a point of pride for Shoreline’s program director, Kim Thompson.

“We got a $370,000 federal grant in 2010 to help our returning veterans,” Thompson said. “It is important that veterans have a place to go on campus where they know they will find support and familiar surroundings. We established a Veterans Center so our veteran students have such a place.”

Equally important are the people who staff the center, Thompson said.

Shoreline has a veteran and former student, Chad Springer, as program coordinator for the center and the on-campus Veterans Club. Springer has successfully navigated the transition from military to civilian life which helps when it comes to interacting with incoming veteran students.

Thompson said she appreciates the recognition by Military Times.

“We have great people working hard to help make the transition as smooth and successful as possible for the men and women who have served our country,” Thompson said.

SCC/Jim Hills

* Math Olympians add up to fun day on campus

Matholympian.jpg

A student from Shoreline School District Home Education Exchange program, holds up her sign before going off to compete in the Shoreline Math Olympiad, March 9, 2013. More photos 

About 750 "mathathletes" along with coaches, teachers, family and friends descended on Shoreline College, March 9, 2013 for the 15th annual Shoreline Math Olympiad, cosponsored by the college, Shoreline School District, Shoreline Public Schools Foundation and James Alan Salon.

The crowd gathered at about 8:30 a.m. in the PUB Cafeteria, then marched off to the gym for last-minute instructions before dispersing to classrooms across the campus for hours of math tests. They all reconvened about noon for lunch and a magic show while scores are tallied. Awards were given for first-seventh places in most grade categories, along with team awards and trophies for the schools with the best turnout.

Award presenters included Shoreline Community College President Lee Lambert, math faculty members Steven Bogart and Fred Kuczmarski, Shoreline School District Superintendent Sue Walker, Shoreline School Board Member David Wilson and others.

The competition is for students in grades 4-8, including students competing from all of the Shoreline and Lake Forest Park public and private schools. Notable additions this year are students from Parkwood Elementary, participating for the first time in the 15-year history of the event. In a special presentation, event organizers presented the school’s math club advisor with team T-shirts before going off to the first round of competition.

Some students may also participate in the Washington State Math Championships and the Math Is Cool regional and state competitions.

For more information and complete results, visit the Shoreline Math Olympiad website at:

https://sites.google.com/site/shorelinematho/

SCC/Jim Hills

* Budget uncertainties impact sabbaticals; officials look for funding alternatives

State and federal budget vagaries are sending Shoreline Community College officials back to the drawing board to find possible funding sources for innovation-related proposals from faculty members.

Letter from Board Chair

Shoreline Community College Board Chair Phil Barrett sent a letter Friday, March 1, 2013, to all college employees and students to expand on his views regarding budget concerns and sabbaticals and urging all to work together to find solutions.

The issue came up at the Feb. 27, 2013 Board of Trustees meeting. On the agenda was a recommendation to forego funding for eight faculty sabbatical leaves during the 2013-14 school year. While the board voted 3-1 to approve the recommendation to not fund the leaves, the trustees also urged faculty and administrators to look for alternatives.

“Personally, I’m going to vote in support of the recommendation because of the budget uncertainties,” said Board Chair Phil Barrett. “But, I want all of you to start talking.”

Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs James Jansen presented the recommendation that came from him, President Lee Lambert and the other two vice presidents, Daryl Campbell and Stephen Smith. 

Jansen noted the considerable unpredictability of federal and state budgets. He acknowledged that under such circumstances, the administration didn’t feel it was wise to commit to funding sabbaticals, a program that has been on hold for the past two years due to previous budget cuts.

Lambert said that a worst-case scenario at the state and federal levels could mean as much as another 25 percent sliced from the college budget, an amount equivalent to all the cuts that occurred over the past four years.

In the open comment period of the meeting prior to the vote, a number of faculty members spoke in favor of retaining sabbatical funding or perhaps delaying the decision until more is known about the state and federal budgets and the implications for college funds.

“What I’m hearing is a lot about what could happen, virtual budget cuts,” said faculty member Neal Vasishth. “Let’s wait for the real numbers.”

Lambert and Amy Kinsel, faculty union president, confirmed that discussions did occur about delaying a decision. The faculty contract calls for sabbaticals to be considered in February and there was skepticism that there would be significantly more information in another month or even a final budget by the session’s scheduled end of April 28.

Barrett said that while all of that may be true, he wants to find a solution.

“I’m totally in agreement with the sabbatical concept,” Barrett said. “But, the Governor owed us a budget 45 days ago and he has not delivered. We are stuck in budget never-never land.”

During his presentation, Jansen said there was the possibility of finding other ways to fund the projects outlined in the sabbatical proposals. A potential option, he said, could be the Innovation and Opportunities Reserve adopted by the trustees this past September as part of a new overall reserves policy.

Barrett and the other board members mulled a second motion to instruct college officials to review the faculty proposals for possible alternative funding sources. In the end, they decided their views would be reflected in the meeting minutes and that a motion was unnecessary.

“I want everyone to know that we, the Board of Trustees, support the value in these proposals,” Barrett said.

In a message to faculty members sent Friday afternoon, Kinsel wrote: " ... the Board instructed the President and the faculty to work together to explore tapping into funds from the President's innovation reserve to support innovative faculty projects, potentially including some of the submitted sabbatical proposals."

SCC/Jim Hills