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* SS&A Budget is main event at special BOT meeting

The 2011-12 Student Services and Activities budget was the reason the Board of Trustees met for a special session on Monday, June 28, 2010. 

 

The Board had not reached consensus to support the budget request at their regularly scheduled meeting on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 where students had proposed an increase to the SS&A fee from $7.09 per credit to $8 per credit.  Things looked different, however, at the special session on Monday, where Board members had the opportunity to look at two other options, ending up approving Proposal #2.

* Proposal TOC
* About SCC
* Comparsion of Colleges
* Fixed Cost Increases
* 10% Cut Impacts
* More 10% Cut Impacts
* Budget Proposal

 

The winning proposal adjusts the Student Services and Activities fee for 2010-2011 (effective July 1, 2010) from $7.09 to $7.65 (a $.56 increase in student fees per quarter) beginning Fall Quarter 2010.  The new budget does not call for the 10% cut across all lines or additional cuts that Proposal 1 included.  Baseline budgets for clubs, however, will be cut from $500 to $300, and this budget does not provide a contingency fund. 

 

SBA President Yasuhiro Sumino and Minister of Finance, Pat Yiu provided expert presentations on all three proposals as well as rationale for each. 

 

“We worked hard to find solutions,” SBA President Sumino said.  And members of the Board noticed.

 

Trustee Shoubee Liaw told the student representatives that their presentation was the best she had seen in a long time.  “That tells me you really understood our (board members) questions.  Thank you for doing such a really good job.” 

 

Chair Roger Olstad agreed with Liaw’s comments, and Trustee Gidget Terpstra told Sumino that he “had a very fine cabinet this year.”  Trustee Phil Barrett was equally impressed with the work of the students.  Trustee Jerry Smith was not in attendance.

 

Proposal #1 had not been a consideration for the trustees because it would require a 10 percent cut from all organizations – including a nearly $3,000 decrease to funding for travel, which would greatly affect the music and athletics programs, funding for such activities as the Student of Color Conference, and the 10 percent cut to the Parent-Child Center would have had to go straight to the pockets of any student using the center. 

 

But proposals #2 and #3 both offered realistic budgets. The second budget proposal called for a $.56 SS&A fee increase – from the current $7.09 per credit up to 10 credits to $7.65, and the third option calling for an increase to $8.00. 

 

Following the student presentations, which included a video of students involved in a service learning project, and some clarifications, the Board got down to business.  

 

President Lambert, who is on annual leave, joined the meeting via telephone, and asked Board members to consider Proposal #3. After various questions by the Board about the third option, it was time to vote. 

 

Trustees Terpstra and Olstad opted for Proposal #3; Liaw and Barrett, for #2. The doors were opened for additional motions. 

 

Barrett said that a middle of the road budget was good and that it seemed to be developed with a good, focused approach (speaking about Proposal #2).

 

More questions brought clarification and in the end, all trustees voted for the proposed budget #2. 

 

                                                        SCC/Donna Myers

 

Special session for trustees on student budget

Special session

  • Day/Date: Monday, June 28
  • Time: 2:30 p.m.
  • Place: Board Room, SCC campus

Links

One down, one to go.

 

Shoreline Community College has an operating budget for 2010-11, but it’s going to take a special session of the Board of Trustees if there’s to be a Student Services and Activities budget by the end of the fiscal year.

 

At their final regularly scheduled meeting of the year, Wednesday, June 23, the trustees approved an overall budget that totals $40.6 million. While a net increase over 2009-10, that figure includes a $1.5 million cut in state-allocated discretionary funds. Increased revenue from tuition, nearly $1 million due to a state-approved rate hike and flood of students looking for help during the economic crisis, accounts for almost all of the increase in the overall budget from last year.

 

While there were no questions from the board about the operating budget, that wasn’t the case when it came time to consider the students’ version. At the core of the concerns was a student proposed increase in what is known as the SS&A fee, from the current $7.09 cents per credit to $8 per credit. The maximum allowed by the state is $8.60

 

“I’m very, very troubled by this increase,” said Trustee Shoubee Liaw.

 

Trustee Phil Barrett said he felt there was little fiscal restraint shown in the students’ budget. “I look through the 2009-10 and the 2010-11 allocations and across the board, everything is up,” Barrett said. “This budget does not show that hard choices were made.”

 

In the end, the budget failed on a 2-2 vote with Liaw and Barrett voting against and Board Chair Roger Olstad and Trustee Gidget Terpstra voting for the motion. Trustee Jerry Smith was absent. However, following the meeting, it was clear that Liaw, Olstad and Terpstra were under the impression that the vote had only denied the rate increase from $7.09 to $8, not the entire student budget that is based on the fee.

 

That budget pays for many things often thought of as integral to the college, including the athletics teams, the Student Leadership Center, the Women's Center &  Multicultural Center, the Parent-Child Center, the Writing & Learning Studio, tutors, Phi Theta Kappa, instrumental music, choral ensembles, opera and musical productions, the Ebbtide student newspaper and other items.

 

College officials and state assistant attorney general Kristin Byrd quickly discussed setting a special meeting to consider the student budget issue. That meeting will be at 2:30 p.m., Monday, June 28, in the Board Room at the college. The meeting details were finalized late Thursday, June 24 and noticed Friday, June 25.

 

The special meeting agenda has just one item, action on the Student Services and Activities budget, and trustees will be presented with three options approved late Friday afternoon by student parliament. Those options outline approaches at the current $7.09 per credit fee, one at a $7.65 per credit fee and one with the fee at $8 per credit. The total budget amounts for the options range from $1 million to $1.2 million.

* Facilities moves from "gas" to "electric"

Shoreline Community College continues its journey to become a sustainable campus, with Facilities recently purchasing two electric vehicles to replace old gas guzzlers. 

 

“Our trucks were in pretty bad shape,” Facilities Director Bob Roehl said about the trucks that were removed from the fleet.  “We had been looking at replacing them for some time – and decided it made sense to go with electric.” 

 

TRUCK.jpgTwo vehicles were purchased from Vantage International – a truck with a dump bed for grounds work that can handle 1,000 pounds and reach 25 mph.  The truck has a hydraulic lift and a trailer hitch for the grounds trailer yet is a good size to navigate the campus grounds.  The second vehicle, a van, will be used for custodial work such as hauling tools and materials and maintenance jobs.  “This will be much more effective than using a pickup.” Roehl said that General Administration purchased the same vehicles and have found them to be very effective both functionally and financially.

 

A plug-in station (20 amps each) was built near the gymnasium by Ron Norimatsu, and Town and Country Fence built a fence to protect the area.  The truck and van will need to be plugged in when their battery charges reach below 75 percent, no more than once a week most likely.

 

The van is expected to be delivered to campus soon.

 

                                                              SCC/Donna Myers

* HR CHANGES

HR changes

 

Hours

Starting immediately, on Monday, June 21, 2010, the Human Resources and Employee Relations Department hours are:

Staffed M-Th, 8am-5pm; Fri, to 4:30pm

  • Open-door hours - 8-11am
  • Closed to walk-in traffic - 11am-2pm
  • Open-door hours - M-Th 2-5pm; Fri to 4:30pm

Entrance
The main entrance to HR will switch to Room 1013. The former entrance, 1012, will generally be locked to entry from the hallway.

 

Phone tree

Calls to the HR main number, 206-546-4769, will be answered by an automated phone tree. The six main branches are:

  • Job information (two sub-branches)
  • Employment verifications (5880)
  • Benefits & retirement (4510)
  • Payroll & TLR (two sub-branches)
  • ADA, LNI, FML (4515)
  • All other questions (5880)

This week

During the week of June 21-25, work will be ongoing to rearrange the office furniture and equipment in the Human Resources and Employee Relations Department and may result in temporary delays in responding to requests.

Budget reductions are bringing both short- and long-term changes to the Human Resources and Employee Relations Department at Shoreline Community College.

 

“A combination of budget-related staff reduction and family leave needs will require us to limit our traditional open-door policy to ensure that our departmental work gets done,” said Stephen Smith, Vice President for Human Resources and Legal Affairs.

 

The short-term impact starts this week, June 21-25. “In preparation for our imminent change in staffing and operations, the HR office will be re-arranging furniture and equipment,” Smith said. “While that’s happening, there may be some delays in responding to requests.”

 

In the long-term category, state-mandated budget reductions mean that Kelly Griffin will be leaving her front-desk position in HR to move to a program secretary position with the dental hygiene program. That change is effective on July 1, 2010.

 

In addition, the timeline for family leave by Elise Mayes moved up, leaving the department extra-shorthanded. “We knew we were headed in this direction, we’re just headed there a bit sooner than expected,” Smith said.

 

So, starting immediately, June 21, 2010, the Human Resources and Employee Relations Department will be closed for unscheduled walk-in customer traffic from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. each day. Department personnel will still be available for walk-in traffic from 8-11 a.m. and 2-5 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and closing at 4:30 p.m. on Fridays.

 

Smith acknowledged that the new schedule is a significant change from past practice that had the HR department open throughout the day. “The change applies only to the main HR offices,” Smith said. “The payroll and benefits offices, Nancy Teske and Ellen Pincus, will continue to be open whenever those staff members are  available.”

 

Also, the main entrance to the department will be changed to Room 1013. The former entrance, 1012, will generally be locked to entry from the hallway. A drop box for documents and other items will be added to the “old” door at 1012 for convenience during times when the front office is closed to walk-in traffic.

 

Besides the physical changes, HR will also begin using an automated “phone tree” to more efficiently route incoming telephone calls to staff. The phone tree will be in operation at all times. Smith said individual phone extensions will continue to be accessible by direct dialing.

* Automotive center on road to Phase III

Autoribboncutting.jpg

Professional Automotive Training Center students cut the ribbon, Tuesday, June 8, 2010, during ceremonies to dedicate the $4.2 million expansion of the center.

 

LINKS

With the snippets of ribbon still fluttering to the floor, officials from the automotive industry and Shoreline Community College were already getting to work on the next phase for the nationally recognized Professional Automotive Training Center (PATC).

 

That next phase was unveiled Tuesday, June 8, 2010, during the ribbon-cutting ceremony for Phase II, a $4.2-million, 26,000-square-foot expansion of the center.

 

“I’m here to announce Phase III,” said Pam Nelson, President of the Puget Sound Auto Dealers Association and owner of Foothills Toyota Scion in Burlington, Wash. “In this technological automotive world, education is critical in maintaining the sophisticated transportation systems we now drive.

 

“So, in partnership with Shoreline Community College, we will expand once more. More international automakers will join us at this facility and hundreds more young people will have the opportunity for excellent high pay, high growth sustainable automotive jobs.”

 

Also announced at ribbon-cutting is a new “Innovation Works” center sponsored by Snap-on Industrial. Innovation Works will be the Northwest hub of The National Coalition of Certification Centers (NC3).

 

NC3 is a partnership between Snap-on Industrial and schools across the U.S., including Shoreline, Gateway Technical College and Lakeshore Technical College in Wisconsin, Francis Tuttle Technology Center in Oklahoma, Wichita Area Technical College in Kansas and New England Institute of Technology in Rhode Island and South Seattle Community College. The NC3 partners will work together to offer nationally certified training in a number of critical manufacturing areas.

 

The current PATC expansion adds to the original 32,000-square-foot center that opened in 1992. To fund the expansion project, $2 million came from the state, $1 million from Toyota USA and rest from the Puget Sound Auto Dealers Association and its members.

 

While the project nearly doubled the size, the expanded center is already full with new industry partners and previous partners now offering more training and education. Current training center industry partners include: Toyota, Honda, GM, Chrysler, Volvo, Hyundai, Snap-on, Hunter Engineering with full-time presences and others such as Subaru, Kia, Volkswagen and Raytheon also using the center.

 

The announcement by Nelson, a third-generation auto dealer, was made possible after a recent PSADA Foundation meeting during which board members voted to spearhead the fundraising efforts for the next expansion of the training center. At this point, no further details have been announced about the drive.

 

The PATC is recognized as the premier automotive technician program in the U.S.  The innovative model was originated by the college and industry partners to integrate education with hands-on experience in the workplace.

 

Every student in one of the four factory-sponsored programs is sponsored by a local automobile dealership.  Students are in a cycle of 11 weeks (one academic quarter) at the PATC, then 11 weeks in their dealership throughout the two-year program.  Students can graduate a two-year Applied Associate in Arts and Sciences degree as well as numerous manufacturer-specific training certificates.

 

The General Service Technician (GST) program is a shorter, non-manufacturer specific program.  GST students attend two quarters at the PATC followed by one quarter in a workplace setting. GST students receive a certificate of proficiency.

 

Today's automotive technician is not just a "mechanic." The electronic and mechanical sophistication of today's vehicles, along with hybrids and full-electric vehicles, means these jobs are highly technical.

 

A U.S. Dept of Labor study predicts that need for automotive technicians will continue to grow "even through downturns in the economy."

 

The average Automotive Technician salary for the region ranges from $50,000 to $52,000, depending on location and the individual's production abilities.  Oftentimes, technicians move into other areas of the automotive industry, including parts, sales, finance and insurance, management, marketing and other career tracks.

 

Because the PATC program is so closely tied to the industry, the job-placement rate for PATC graduates is high, approaching to 100 percent.

 

SCC/ Jim Hills

* President of PSADA announces Phase III of automotive training center expansion ribbon-cutting

Ribbon-cuttings are usually ceremonies to launch the work that has already been done.

On Tuesday, June 8, 2010, Shoreline Community College drew about 400 people to a ribbon-cutting that did the usual, inaugurating a $4.2 million expansion of the Professional Automotive Training Center, and then it did more, much more.

 

“I’m here to announce Phase 3,” said Pam Nelson, President of the Puget Sound Auto Dealers Association and owner of Foothills Toyota Scion in Burlington, Wash. “In this technological automotive world, education is critical in maintaining the sophisticated transportation systems we now drive.

 

“So, in partnership with Shoreline Community College, we will expand once more. More international automakers will join us at this facility and hundreds more young people will have the opportunity for excellent high pay, high growth sustainable automotive jobs.”

 

Nelson, a third-generation auto dealer, said the college training center is a “partnership between auto dealers and automakers that creates jobs, improves lives and does it efficiently and economically.”

 

Nelson’s announcement was made possible after a recent PSADA Foundation meeting during which board members voted to spearhead the fundraising efforts for the next expansion of the training center. At this point, no further details have been announced about the drive.

 

The current expansion added 26,000 square feet to the original 32,000-square-foot center that opened in 1992. While it nearly doubled the size, the expanded center is already full with new industry partners and previous partners now offering more training and education. Current training center industry partners include: Toyota, Honda, GM, Chrysler, Volvo, Hyundai, Snap-on, Hunter Engineering with full-time presences and others such as Subaru, Kia, Volkswagen and Raytheon also using the center.

 

The Tuesday ceremony was emceed by SCC President Lee Lambert. Speakers included:

  • State Rep. Maralyn Chase, D-32nd Dist
  • Bill Bergen, Toyota University
  • Vicki Giles Fabre, Washington Auto Dealers Association
  • Pam Nelson, PSADA Foundation and Foothills Toyota Scion
  • Frederick Brookhouse, Snap-on Industrial
  • Frank Ferrara, Hyundai of America
  • Paul Svenkerud, Honda of Seattle
* Grand Opening & Ribbon Cutting of Newly Expanded Professional Automotive Training Center

Already tops in the country, the automotive technician training program at Shoreline Community College (Shoreline) is about to get bigger and better.

 

On June 8, college, state and industry officials will be on hand as students cut the ribbon for the just-completed $4.2 million expansion of the Professional Automotive Training Center. More than just a capital project at a community college, the expanded center represents a confluence that has considerable economic impact to individuals, companies and the state.

 

Starting at 2 p.m. in the training center, 16101 Greenwood Ave. N., Shoreline, WA 98133, the program is open to the public. In addition to presentations and the ribbon-cutting, the latest vehicles and automotive technology will be on display with guided tours of the facility.

 

“This program is all about good jobs for our students and good employees for the automobile dealers,” said Don Schultz, program director. “This is a partnership where everybody wins.” 

 

The expansion project itself was a partnership. Of the total cost, $2 million came from the state of Washington, with the rest from automotive-industry sources, including $1 million from Toyota USA and more than $1 million from members of the Puget Sound Automobile Dealers Association (PSADA).

 

“The dealers support this program because it works,” said Jim Hammond, executive director of PSADA. “It has the best instructors in the country, in the best facility and it turns out the best students.”

 

Starting in 1978 with classes on emissions control, the foundations from Shoreline and PSADA worked together to fund and build the original center, which opened in 1992. The center now educates about 120 students a year and provides skill-upgrade training for anywhere from 6,000 to 10,000 currently employed workers a year. Student-program partners include Toyota, Honda, GM and Chrysler. For current-worker training, the list includes those four plus: Hyundai, Volvo, Subaru, Nissan, Snap-on Tools, Hunter Engineering and PSADA-sponsored classes.

 

“There’s nothing like Shoreline in the country,” said Jack Carroll, owner of Jack Carroll Automotive, in Lynnwood, Wash.

 

Brad Miller, owner of Toyota and Honda dealerships in the Seattle area, said, “In my estimation, (the program) is an example of government/private enterprise and partnership at its finest.”

 

The expansion adds 26,000 square feet to the existing 32,000-square-foot center. The additional space allows for a corporate center for Toyota, and dedicated training spaces with vehicle lifts and classrooms for Hyundai, Volvo, Hunter, Snap-on and others. Schultz said that Snap-on is creating a “Center for Innovation” in its space.

 

“Snap-on has been a great partner. They donated hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of tools and tool benches,” Schultz said. “Now, with the Snap-on Center for Innovation, Shoreline will become a center for training and technology for the next generation.”

 

Schultz said that PEMCO Insurance Company is another key supporter of the center.   “Stanley O. McNaughton, Jr., then-CEO was instrumental and Stan McNaughton, III, and his foundation board have continued that support,” Schultz said.

 

* Ford Motor Company Showcases next generation auto safety technologies & innovations

Get a firsthand look at Ford Motor Company’s new generation high-tech safety innovations at the “Future of Safety,” from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Thursday, June 3, 2010 at the Professional Automotive Training Center (PATC) at Shoreline Community College. 

Ford Motor Company (FMC), in collaboration with PATC, will provide demonstrations of the world’s first production-ready rear inflatable seat belts, which will debut on the redesigned Ford Explorer that will go into production later this year. 

Participants will have the opportunity to test drive and experience firsthand how Ford is using smart sensors, including radar, camera and wireless technologies, to develop new crash avoidance and driver assist systems that detect and help drivers recognize and respond to collision risks more quickly. 
 
The event will offer a demonstration of the world’s first production-ready rear inflatable seat belts on the next generation Ford Explorer and a self-parking car.  Featured safety technologies will include MyKey™; SYNC®: Traffic, Directions & Information; BLIS® (Blind Spot Information System); Active Park Assist; Integrated Blind Spot Mirrors; and Cross Traffic Alert.

The event also offers a sneak peek at the next-generation, yet-to-be-revealed Ford Explorer, which goes into production later in 2010, and includes the world’s first inflatable seat belts for rear passengers and a next-generation radar-enabled collision warning system.

Shoreline Community College is located at 16101 Greenwood Avenue North, just west of Aurora Avenue and north of Seattle city limits.  The Professional Automotive Training Center is located at the north end of campus.