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* Obama Administration releases report on U.S. Manufacturing

One of the most important responsibilities the government has is to help foster the conditions for sustainable growth and the creation of good jobs. The Obama Administration’s approach to manufacturing will do just this, unleashing innovation, helping workers prosper, and fostering some of the most important industries of the future.  (From “A Framework for Revitalizing American Manufacturing,” a report on federal policy designed to support an evolving industry. 

 

On December 16, 2009, the Executive Office of the President of the United States released the document, “A Framework for Revitalizing American Manufacturing,” an analysis report that provides key facts and assumptions that form the basis for development of sound and comprehensive federal policy to support a successful U.S. manufacturing industry in today’s global economy.  Shoreline Community College President Lee Lambert was working behind-the-scenes supporting the pivotal role of higher education in a successful manufacturing workforce to be considered in the policymaking.    

 

In October of 2008 Lambert was one of 25 education leaders from across the country to be named to a national council to help develop national strategies to keep the American manufacturing workforce globally competitive and to create more high-paying jobs.  As a charter member of the Education Council, selected by the Manufacturing Institute, the research, education and workforce arm of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), Lambert and his fellow team members helped shape major educational and workforce development initiatives to close the skills gap and to help young people and transitioning workers find new careers in the manufacturing economy.  

 

“Community colleges were chosen as the delivery system because they have a successful track record,” said Emily DeRocco, president of The Manufacturing Institute and former U.S. assistant secretary of labor for employment and training. “They have taken the lead in adapting their postsecondary education to meet industry needs in their regional economies.”

 

Council members were appointed to focus on issues as wide-ranging as identifying solutions to address the adult literacy crisis, designing regional manufacturing talent development systems, creating 21st century career and technical education programs and advancing innovation in the manufacturing economy. 

 

In May of 2009, Shoreline was selected as one of four colleges to receive National Manufacturing Institute grant funding through the Gates Foundation to fund a pilot program to implement the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM)-endorsed Manufacturing Skills

Read about SCC's NAM-endorsed Manufacturing Skills Certification Program.  
Certification System.  The integrated educational program prepares students with entry-level skills to succeed in advanced manufacturing careers. The grant funds will focus on low-income young adults and transitioning workers.

 

“In these difficult economic times, we must create new educational pathways to help more individuals prepare for high-paying manufacturing jobs and, in turn, help our companies compete in world markets,” said DeRocco.

 

"A framework for Revitalizing American Manufacturing"

 

 

* Service learning component is bonus for Taylor Ames

Taylor Ames values the bounty of educational opportunities offered at Shoreline Community College.  So much so that the 17-year-old Running Start student is willing to travel by ferry to not only work toward a transfer degree but also to help him examine and define how he feels about contemporary moral issues.

 

Ames enrolled in Philosophy 102 for Fall Quarter 2009, because he wanted to confront social challenges such as capital punishment, war and violence, animal rights, environmental degradation and discrimination.  The writings of Greek philosophers Plato and Socrates had intrigued him for some time and the idea of applying that interest into current ethics was what determined he would take philosophy classes.

 

While Ames was eager for the academic challenge, the class also included a service-learning component, something he was less sure about.

 

“At first I wasn’t sure about the service learning part of the class, but then as I got involved, I realized how much more powerful it was, taking my knowledge from the classroom into the real world,” Ames said. The class offered a number of options to satisfy the service learning piece and Ames chose Amnesty International (AI), saying that he appreciated the direction he got from Kaelyn Caldwell, SCC’s service learning coordinator.  

 

Ames’ first AI meeting was in the basement of a church in the Wallingford district of Seattle. The activities of the worldwide organization that supports human rights rang true to him, but it felt a little too bureaucratic for his taste. He committed to return to learn more and, after a second meeting, Ames said he realized the structure was integral to the group’s success and he was off and running.

 

Although Ames has been involved in activities through the Seattle AI chapter, he wanted to do more and decided to try drumming up interest for a chapter at Shoreline.  Ames worked with Minister of Social Justice Ava Munson who joined him as co-founder of the AI group. “She has a wealth of experience and has endless exuberance for the volunteer opportunities that we hope to provide through our Amnesty chapter at SCC.” 

 

Ames said he tried a table at the PUB, but his most successful

What is service learning?

Service-learning links meaningful service opportunities with the academic curriculum. It is a holistic and hands-on model of education that expands the walls of the classroom into the community.

 

Through intentional cycles of reflection and action, service-learning enables students to discover for themselves how academic theories are linked to the real world.

 

The number of courses with service-learning options continues to grow at SCC.  Students currently select from several arenas – from epidemics and culture to business law to philosophy and sustainability.  

venture to date has been visiting classes to raise awareness by talking about the organization.  “Getting them to sign up as members and go to events, write letters become aware and share issues would be the ultimate goal – it could be consistent part of their lives,” Ames said.  

 

One of the more hands-on activities that Ames found particularly fulfilling was the annual Global Write-a-thon, AI’s letter-writing campaign to request the release of prisoners of conscience who have been denied human rights.  “Anybody can help these innocent people by simply writing a letter,” he said.  Ames wrote several letters – one in support of a woman in Mexico who had been beaten and sexually assaulted, another, a trade unionist in an Iranian prison.  “He is in poor health and he was trying to help others,” Ames said.

 

While there’s still work ahead to create an AI chapter at Shoreline, Ames said he is working with faculty members Paul Herrick, Larry Fuell and Dean Kenny Lawson to realize his goal.

 

And it all began by signing up for Philosophy 102.

 

“I really appreciate the connections I made because of this class,” Ames said. While the philosophy class itself was exceptional, he said it was the service-learning component that resulted in supporting the work of AI that was the most rewarding part.  “Meeting other people who care about the same things that I care about…well, that was really good.” 

 

Ames said that after his time at Shoreline, he plans to transfer to four-year school, complete bachelor’s degree in international relations and then join the Peace Corps.

 

 

* MLK Day food drive, a service learning project

Nine ways to give
The nine participating grocery stores in the SCC MLK Day of Service Food Drive, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Jan. 18, 2010 are:


Central Market

            15505 Westminster Way

Fred Meyer

            18325 Aurora Ave. N.

            13000 Lake City Way

Greenwood Market

            8500 Third Ave NW

QFC   

            9999 Holman Road

            3020 NE 127th St.
Safeway

            8704 Greenwood Ave. N

            15332 Aurora Ave. N
            12318 15th Ave. NE

Every January, students, faculty and staff from Shoreline Community College join millions of others around the country to pay tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This year, along with speeches and other activities, the college is planning a food drive on Jan. 18 at nine local grocery stores as the focal point for a day of community service in King’s honor.

 

“MLK Day was declared a national day of service by Congress in 1994,” said Kaelyn Caldwell, SCC’s service-learning coordinator. “What better way to honor Dr. King than to bring a community together to help others on his day?”

 

Coordinated through the Center for Service Learning, Caldwell also worked with SCC Veterans Center coordinator Jonathan Phillips and student Ava Munson, who serves in student government as Minister of Social Justice. The project is supported by the Dr. Ronald E. Bell Student Leadership Fund through the SCC Foundation.

 

“Local food banks and the people who rely on them are suffering. Demand is increasing while donations are not,” Caldwell said.  Food banks in the Shoreline/North Seattle area have reported a 30 percent increase in the use of their emergency food services, she said.

 

The drive’s goal is ambitious, to collect 25,000 pounds of food. Volunteers will be at nine local grocery stores (see box) to take donations from 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Jan. 18. Volunteers will also have suggested shopping lists with those items most needed by food banks.

 

All donations will be distributed to partnering food banks, including: Hopelink, the Greenwood Food Bank and North Helpline/Lake City Food Bank. While the main thrust of the drive will be on Martin Luther King Day at the nine grocery stores, Caldwell said the team, which includes more than 20 students, will also take donations Jan.19 on campus.

 

Caldwell said the team can always use more volunteers. “This is your chance to engage as a volunteer in the first Annual SCC King Day of Service,” she said. Volunteers can register for three-hour shifts at http://www.mysignup.com/cgi-bin/view.cgi?datafile=drivingouthunger.  

 

If you have questions, please contact Caldwell at 206-533-6690. 

 

Service learning at SCC

Nine ways to give
The nine participating grocery stores in the SCC MLK Day of Service Food Drive, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Jan. 18, 2010 are:


Central Market

            15505 Westminster Way

Fred Meyer

            18325 Aurora Ave. N.

            13000 Lake City Way

Greenwood Market

            8500 Third Ave NW

QFC   

            9999 Holman Road

3020 NE 127th St.
Safeway

8704 Greenwood Ave. N            15332 Aurora Ave. N
            12318 15th Ave. NE

 

In October, 2007, the college joined Washington Campus Compact, a statewide coalition of colleges and universities to promote service learning.  Washington Campus Compact has a grant from AmeriCorps*VISTA to help serve people in poverty through service learning.

                                                                                  Donna Myers/PIO

* Fall 2009 Nursing Graduation

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Some of the 2009 Fall Quarter Nursing grads pose on the steps in the PUB.  More photos.

Families, friends, faculty and staff celebrated with nursing students at the Fall Quarter 2009 nursing graduation ceremony last night in the PUB. 

Shoreline Community College Association of Nursing Students (SCCANS) Club co-presidents Juliane Hanes and Scott Dakins and Nursing faculty Pat Olsen congratulated the 27 grads and Bette Perman shared personal accolades about the students as they received their certificates and flowers. Darrell Owens gave the faculty address and Heather Gardner and Robin Lor were the student speakers. 

Congratulations to: Danielle Bonney, Tim Cordery, Nancy Courchaine, Suzie DeKerlegand, Heather Gardner, Carrie Sue Hall, Hadly James, Jeffrey Jarvis, Lauren K. Johnson, Katie Keophila, Ellen Hyewyun Kim, Evelyn Kim, Acacia Mai Krebs, Jules Kuhry, Robin A. Lor, Dana A. Malick, Kim McCullough, Lisa Morris, Rebecca Parker, Kevan M. Petterson, Kate Renno, Kelli Salisbury, Vivian Elizabeth Shields, Trista C.M. Wagstaff, Jennifer R. Westin, Justin Y.I. Yoshimoto and Lisa Anne Zegan.

"This is one of my favorite events of the year as we have the opportunity to publicly acknowledge the hard work and accomplishments of our graduates," said Georgia Pierce, Director of Nursing.

The Nursing Program is supported by Joan Crymes Heeter Scholarship, the Margaret Mallet Nursing Endowment Fund and the Elizabeth R. Thomas Alumni Scholarships.  For more information about these scholarships, please contact the SCC Foundation.

SCC/Donna Myers